Technology is shaping the way we think, interact, and live our daily lives. Some technology devices and systems are very intuitive and easy to use, then there are those gadets that you need a little help figuring out.

Introducing Enjoy.  

Enjoy is a personal commerce business currently based in San Francisco and New York.  The entire platform is not about the technology, but more importantly the people at the company. Founded by Ron Johnson, who helped create the Apple Store experience, he launched what he calls the "worlds first personal commerce platform." 

Enjoy sells tech gadets on-line and once purchased an Enjoy employee will not only hand deliver the product to you, but spend an hour teaching you how to use the device. They will meet you at your house, office, or even a coffee shop. The company also offers services of teaching you how to use your previously owned tech gear as well for only $99. Enjoy is not meant to help people with broken gadgets, but more so educate the customer on how to truly leverage and optimize their device to its fullest potential. 

Enjoy experts are staffed employees with salaries, benefits, and equity stake in the company. 

Partner companies with Enjoy are paying the company to sell their product through the Enjoy site. Enjoy provides its partners with first hand feedback from customers and providing a service that helps minimize returned products, calls to customer service departments, as well as building brand loyalty. Current partners include Sonos, Microsoft, GoPro, and AT&T. AT&T also plans on offering Enjoy services from its own website.

More companies are subscribing to this personal commerce model. We see it with grocery, transportation, laundry, and now technology. As brands increasingly recognize that it is no longer about their product or service, but the experience, they will all eventually start incorporating a personal commerce type model. I can go on about how cool of a concept this is, but I rather share the company video with you.  Check it out!

Defy the Conventional,

L.Byrd

Comment